Here are projects I’m working on. I hope they pique your interest.

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Who leads the shepherd?

A young shepherd from Bethlehem sees and hears angels announce the birth of the Messiah. He tags along with the men who visit the baby Jesus in a stable.

Nearly thirty-three years pass.

Jeremiah, the shepherd boy is now the leader of his band of shepherds. Jesus life is one of teaching and healing. When a tragic accident leaves Jeremiah’s best friend cripple, he sets out with his slave, Sabah and his mentally challenged son, Adam to find the Healer.

Jeremiah’s search leads him through cities and countryside. He meets some who believe in Jesus as the Messiah, some who see him only as a good rabbi, and some who see him as a fraud. By the time he finally catches up with Jesus, it’s Passover in the third year of Jesus’ ministry.

This roller-coaster ride of emotion and drama will help you explore your faith and how you express it.

 

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Expressions of Faith

The first is a series, this book leads the reader through the book of Hebrews in a series of 52 thought provoking studies and six opportunities to dig deeper and deepen your understanding and add new insights to your study. The following is from the Preface.

  • This is not a typical book of devotional readings and responses.

  • I don’t enjoy typical devotional books…

    …for a variety of reasons, none of which are significant in this Preface.

  • I helped lead a study of the book “The Way of a Worshiper” by Buddy Owens.

  • The study was over several weeks in my Sunday morning life group.

  • Chapter 15—Reading God’s Mind, Praying God’s Thoughts—opens with this quote.

“Approach the Bible not only as a book which was once spoken, but a book which is now speaking. God’s speaking is in the continuous present.” A. W. Tozer (1897-1963

  • The following paragraph changed the way I read the Bible.

“The Scriptures are starting points in our conversations with God. So how do you let the Bible direct your prayer life? Let me suggest a method:

Read for depth, not for distance.”

Buddy Owens. “The Way of a Worshiper.” (2005)

ISBN: 1-4174-9999-1. Pages 115-116

  • Owens goes on to explain that when you spend more than one morning reading a passage, you notice new truths every day.

  • He uses the analogy of driving on freeways to get to your destination versus driving along scenic routes, taking in the beauty and uniqueness of the area.

  • I embraced that Bible reading strategy.

  • That’s why I have notes on so many verses.

  • Those notes morphed into this Expressions of Faith series.

  • There is space to write in this book. What you write varies in form and content. Most are not writing answers to questions.

Expressions of Faith is coming soon!

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Teach Like The Teacher

This is a how-to book for teachers of any age and any content area. Short and direct in its presentation with examples galore, this resource will help professors, school teachers, homeschoolers, Sunday school teachers, and parents. From the front matter…

Jesus was a poor Jewish rabbi from a backwater town in Roman occupied Judea. His teachings changed the world. What can we learn from what He did and how He did what He did?

 Overview/Table of Contents

Realize that Every Student is Unique in Some Way

1.    Use Illustrations and Analogies

2.   Provide Different Explanations of the Same Content

3.   Ask Questions

4.   Make Students Think

5.    Give Relevant Assignments

6.   Use Groups When Appropriate while Holding Individuals Accountable

7.   Accept that Your Students Won’t All “Get It” at the Same Time

8.   Validate Student Effort and Production

The Tangible Imperative

References and Resources 

Here’s a snippet of a very rough draft. I hope you’re intrigued. Sign up for my newsletter, The Downing Report, for periodic updates!   “I know those guys, Mom,” Randal said.  “What? How?”  “I followed Dad more than a few times after he left his sale’s kit in the smudge pot storage shed in the orchard. I know what they do to people who cheat them.”  “But, no one kills a person over a few dollars.”  “These guys do. I was there when they killed Dad.”  Emma’s eyes opened wide.  “The police said it was a hit and run.”  “The police didn’t even come to the scene. I stayed around until an ambulance came and took his body away.”  “You must be mistaken.”  “I’m not wrong, Mom. There was a lookout standing by a light pole where <street> crosses <street>. When Dad got to the corner, the lookout nodded. A Packard on <street> started up. The driver floored it and off’d Dad. I know the police called it a hit and run, but it wasn’t no accident.”  The color drained from Emma’s face. How did her son know what some of those words meant?  “I’ll take care of this for you, Mom.” He took a step toward her with his arm outstretched.  “No,” she managed.  “Yes, Mo—”  “You will do what I tell you when I tell you to do it.”  The cold expressionless sentence stopped Randal in his tracks. His arm dropped to his side. His mother never used that tone. Ever.

Here’s a snippet of a very rough draft. I hope you’re intrigued. Sign up for my newsletter, The Downing Report, for periodic updates!

“I know those guys, Mom,” Randal said.

“What? How?”

“I followed Dad more than a few times after he left his sale’s kit in the smudge pot storage shed in the orchard. I know what they do to people who cheat them.”

“But, no one kills a person over a few dollars.”

“These guys do. I was there when they killed Dad.”

Emma’s eyes opened wide.

“The police said it was a hit and run.”

“The police didn’t even come to the scene. I stayed around until an ambulance came and took his body away.”

“You must be mistaken.”

“I’m not wrong, Mom. There was a lookout standing by a light pole where <street> crosses <street>. When Dad got to the corner, the lookout nodded. A Packard on <street> started up. The driver floored it and off’d Dad. I know the police called it a hit and run, but it wasn’t no accident.”

The color drained from Emma’s face. How did her son know what some of those words meant?

“I’ll take care of this for you, Mom.” He took a step toward her with his arm outstretched.

“No,” she managed.

“Yes, Mo—”

“You will do what I tell you when I tell you to do it.”

The cold expressionless sentence stopped Randal in his tracks. His arm dropped to his side. His mother never used that tone. Ever.